One Crazy Drive

Hello, again my dear readers!

At last, I bring to you our tale of the journey over the mountains to the West Coast of New Zealand.  We had bought two chicken coops on Trade Me, and they were for collection by the buyer. Victor got up bright and early, and nipped down the road to collect a car transporter, as there was no way our ordinary trailer would hold even the bigger of the two coops by itself, let alone both together! Would we be able to collect them both and bring them back in one day? Would they fit, and would our vehicle be up to the task?

Our drive over was uneventful, except for a heavily laden cyclist on a tricky hill, but we were happily entertained by the use of the age-appropriate children’s radio broadcast Adventures In Odyssey by Focus on the Family as we drove through sunny hill country, grand beech forests, and remote farmland. We had a few stops for toilet breaks and for food (plus one to collect our old chicken water barrel), but our adventure didn’t really start until we arrived in Stillwater, on the outskirts of Greymouth.

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We stopped to pick up our first coop, the larger of the two, and were asked to wait around fifteen minutes for the front loader to come from next door. We spent the time mostly looking over our purchase and talking to the man who built it.  He is a retired builder, and we could tell that he puts his heart and soul into whatever he does.  His other coops, dog runs and other sorts of small but well-designed buildings were all over the small farm section.  He even offered us some extra things like a bag of clean wood shavings to line the coop when we got it to our home.  When the front loader arrived, the builder took time to make sure that the coop was properly loaded, and he and his grandson helped to secure ratchet tie-downs and add orange flags to the coop to make it stand out more on the road.  He offered a little advice on driving such a heavy load that was also very much appreciated.  We left feeling very happy with our purchase and wondering strongly if we might see the kind old builder again.

Our second big stop was to pick up the little colourful “maternity coop” as Victor calls it.  We waited what seemed like forever to find someone who could help us load it.  We had tried to call in advance to tell them when we would arrive, but no one had picked up.  We certainly had arranged to pick it up that day in any case.

Honeybee and Stargazer spent their time wandering around looking at the ponies, climbing random things, swinging on the little two-person swing and generally having a good time.  Duckie spent most of the time waiting asleep.  Victor and I wandered around mostly just talking about the big coop.   It wasn’t that the little coop wasn’t nice… it just isn’t quite as grand as our big coop.  Eventually, the landowner was able to get his forklift and helped to load the coop.

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They Both Fit!

By now it was getting dark, even though the West Coast is supposed to be only three hours drive from home and we had left at ten o’clock in the morning. By mid-April, the days here are getting noticeably short. We certainly wouldn’t have wanted to go on such an expedition any later in the year!

We had originally expected to be home in time for dinner. In typical Kiwi Homesteading style, where everything takes longer than expected, that didn’t happen. So it was dinner in Greymouth, where the golden arches came to our rescue, and then off down the highway. Ducky’s cherished blanket toy was a casualty of war, sadly, lost (we think) on the side of the road.

Now there are two main roads over the Southern Alps between Canterbury and the West Coast. The longer, gentler, more northerly route is the Lewis Pass, which we took on the way over. Since it was already so late, we decided to come back over Arthur’s Pass, the more direct route. As we headed east along Highway 73, we passed grim signs: “Ye who bear heavy burdens, beware the road ahead,” and, “Turn back now, lest thy carriage prove unworthy,” and finally, “Fly, you fools!”

Well, actually the sign may or may not have been more mundane like this: “STEEP GRADES. NOT RECOMMENDED FOR TOWING VEHICLES.” But this is Middle-Earth, after all.

At first, we wondered what all the fuss was about. It wasn’t until we left the gentle valley of the Taramakau and started up the Otira Gorge itself that it became evident that the warning was not in vain. Victor watched as the gear counter, which started at a healthy 5 out of 6, went inexorably down to 4, then 3, then 2… the accelerator was on the floor… the engine toiled manfully as we crawled, inch by inch, up the perilously winding road and the long slope of the dreadful Viaduct.

Just as we thought that the engine was at its final gasp, we started to climb faster, and I exclaimed that it couldn’t be the car doing this, it was God pushing us up the hill! The girls and I all praised God as we continued to gain speed in our climbing efforts.  Each time the car seemed like it would slow we in earnest prayed loudly something like “Please! push this car up the hill, God!”.  Stargazer yelled “You can do it, God! I know you can!”.

Not long after that, the slope lessened, and we soon saw, standing tall in our headlights, the Dobson Memorial, marking the summit of the high pass.

There were two remaining questions for us. The first and most vexing was that of fuel. There are very few petrol stations in the Southern Alps, and even though we had filled up in Greymouth, our car needed lots to drink to get over Arthur’s Pass and the gentler but higher Porter’s Pass, and on the further side of Porter’s there was still a long road over the plains. Mercifully, the petrol station at Springfield was still open.  It is fairly rare petrol stations to be open late at night in the country.  Victor certainly sighed in relief when we pulled up and noticed that it was actually a 24/7 pay-at-the-pump type petrol station.

The second was whether we would fall asleep, especially Victor, whose eyelids were starting to droop. I wasn’t in any better shape myself, and my eyes were sore and my vision blurred. The roads were almost deserted, and the river mist lay thick on the land. The music was either grating on our ears or sending us to sleep. Finally, we were resorting to trying to name animals, chemical elements, books of the Bible… anything to keep our minds alert as we drove those last few miles.

We made it home in one piece, and after cleaning up a carsick Ducky and putting to bed the older two, we were only too pleased, after a successful but very tiring expedition, to collapse into bed ourselves.

I hope you have enjoyed our story for the evening.  We will follow this up with a post with more photos of our coops and the work we have done to set them up.  Please follow us on Facebook if you haven’t already as we will likely post quite a few more pictures there than on here. You may also get a few sneak peeks at our new animals.

Colossians 3:17: “And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.

~Grace

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Investigations into Livestock Animals

Hello, my fine readers! How are you today? Have you been doing any fun projects lately? What about God’s mission? Is He leading you on any interesting paths?

Well, Victor and I have been sort of pulled into a strange mission by our ears. It would seem that God in all of His infinite wisdom needed us to become homesteaders so that we would make connections with people nearby and join a movement to save one of His critically endangered goat breeds.

photo courtesy of Heather O’Neill

In New Zealand, there is a small island with a long history leading back to good ol’ Captain James Cook. The story goes that in 1773, Captain Cook decided to leave a couple of his favourite goats with the leader of a tribe on a small island located in the Marlborough Sounds, at the northeast tip of the South Island of New Zealand. He is said to have also released a few of them into the wild just prior to setting off at sea so that if he ever came back he would have an instant food source. The breed that developed from those goats is known as the Arapawa Island Goat. There are less than 300 (correction 400) live Arapawas in the world today. They may, in fact, be the most critically endangered goat breed in the world.

So you’re probably wondering why this breed should matter to you … Well, from what I’ve read and heard about through the NZ Arapawa Goat Association, these goats are special.

They have unique genes which are only very distantly related to any other currently known breed. Unfortunately, the breed of goat that Captain Cook raised (the Old English goat) is considered extinct as far as we know so we cannot test current day Arapawas against the Old English Goat genes to see if they are the same. It is unlikely that they are the same exact breed because the span of several hundred years is more than enough time to change a breed’s genetic heritage. That said, these are believed to be the closest thing that we have to that old hardy everyman sort of goat.

Unlike many of the commercial breeds who have been specifically bred to be dwarfed, Arapawas are naturally small. A full-size Arapawa is not usually much bigger than a medium sized dog. They have great milk from what I’ve heard, which is said to be as sweet and as creamy as the Nigerian Dwarf breed, but having the nutty flavour of a Nubian. They are also naturally high milk producers despite their small size. I can’t wait to try some myself!

Arapawas are also really healthy animals from what I understand. While they may not have as much immune protection to commercial farming (they do suffer from worms fairly easily), their immune systems are great at lifestyle and small farming ventures. They lived for hundreds of years without much input from man but are also very humanly social and friendly after only a couple of generations of domestication. Victor and I considered trying to get a normal breed like the Nigerians, or the Nubians, but when we were faced with an opportunity to help save a special variety of goat it made total sense to us to try. I mean, just look at this face!

Mayhem by Heather O’Neill

Please consider helping to support this critically endangered species by praying, volunteering, donating to the cause, or maybe even taking on a few of these beautiful creatures if you have the time and space! Please click on the links below for more information!

https://www.rarebreeds.co.nz/arapawagoat.html and http://www.arapawagoats.com/dna.html

 

May God bless you and keep you!

~Grace

*all photos courtesy of Heather O’Neill on the Arapawa Facebook group’s page. Thank you very much for allowing me to use your beautiful animals here!